“ …No work ’til Monday. Doo be doo, doo doo be, doo be doo be doo!”

There’s no denying this song has a nice ring to it. Made popular by Hawaii singer Kimo Kahoano in the early ‘80s, the tune is cheery and upbeat, and for good reason – it celebrates the end of a long work week! Whether we hear it on the morning drive or hum it over that routine cup of coffee, the song has become the state’s unofficial anthem every Aloha Friday.

Rainbows mean it’s going to be a GREAT day!

Thankfully, Kimo beat Rebecca Black to it because having her take on Friday revelry would be the unfortunate end to an era (before it even began!). Aloha Friday’s a sigh of relief for workers; the weight of the week is lifted from their shoulders, adding a noticeable hop in each step closer to the usually dreaded 9-to-5. Sometimes, they “dress down,” out of the usual suit get-up. The office is a little more chipper; the boss is laid-back (sometimes) and eight hours later, you’re having pau hana drinks ‘till the wee hours of the weekend.

The aloha shirt played a big role in the start of Aloha Friday. In 1965, a group of Hawaiian fashionistas lobbied at the State Capitol for male employees to wear aloha shirts on the last day of the work week in order to embrace the culture. A year later, Aloha Friday was in full swing. Younger generations took to the casual style and gladly did away with the suit-and-tie combo favored by generations before them. By the 70s, aloha wear had become the work norm for any day of the week.

As Aloha Friday grew in popularity here, mainland businessmen started to take notice, too. Eventually, the custom carried overseas and evolved into “Casual Fridays.” Whatever the term, it’s now a way for the world to kick off the weekend a little early.

Happy Aloha Friday, everyone!


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